Permian Period for Kids - the earliest dinosaurs
SIGN IN / SUBSCRIBE TO KIDIPEDE
LOG OUT


Permian Period

Crocodiles
Crocodiles

About 290 million years ago, the Carboniferous period ended and the Permian period began. Almost all of the land on Earth grouped together in one big supercontinent we call Pangaea, which reached all the way from the North Pole to the South Pole. With all the land grouped together, the climate got drier, which was bad for water-loving plants and animals like ferns and frogs, but good for dry land plants and animals, so there got to be a lot more of them. The first reptiles were already living on land, but during the Permian period there got to be many more reptiles, and more different kinds of reptiles.

At the same time, more and more pine trees also spread all over the land. It was easy for these trees and reptiles to spread over all of the land, because it was all joined together in one big continent.

At the end of the Permian period, about 248 million years ago, there was an even bigger catastrophe than ever before. This may have been a giant volcanic explosion in what is now Siberia. It wiped out more than 95 percent of all life in the oceans, and about 70 percent of life on land, both plants and animals. This catastrophe is the end of the Permian period, and the next period is the Triassic period.


To find out more about geology, check out these books from Amazon.com or from your library:

Geological Eras
Main Geology page
Science for Kids home page
Kidipede home page



Copyright 2012-2014 Karen Carr, Portland State University. This page last updated 2014. Powered by Dewahost.
About - Contact - Privacy Policy - What do the broom and the mop say when you open the closet door?
-->